Williamsburg Brooklyn

HOLLAND TUNNEL GALLERY IS RE-OPENING

On Friday April 15, 2016, the original Holland Tunnel Gallery, founded in 1997, has re-opened its space to artists again.  After closing in 2007, with the exception of special art events, the exhibition open up! is the first show the new schedule

SEE WHAT'S HAPPENING FOR MORE DETAILS

n November 1997 Dutch artist Paulien Lethen used the Home Depot garden shed model Chelsea, 8 x 10 ft./2 ½ x 3 m,  she had installed in her backyard for plants in the winter, as an exhibition space. Holland Tunnel Gallery was born. From 1997-2007 Lethen presented a monthly show schedule. Every exhibition became a unique installation with interaction between art and the unusual space. The gallery gained recognition in the international art world and became a neighborhood icon as a microcosm of local and international talent. Roberta Smith, art critic of The New York Times, reported: "One of the quirkiest spaces in Williamsburg is Holland Tunnel, on South Third Street, a front-runner for first place as the tiniest gallery in the metropolitan area.
Music and events have always added a lively element to Holland Tunnel Gallery. As the gallery only accommodates six people at a time, the parking lot between the adjoining brownstones serves as meeting point, bar location and stage - no matter pouring rain or freezing cold. Visitors can dance to live jazz, rock and blues. From 2007 on the original Holland Tunnel Gallery only opens for special events.

 

PARIKIA PAROS GREECE

ART AND EVENTS
IN HISTORIC HOUSE

SEE CALENDAR FOR EXHIBITION SCHEDULE SUMMER 2016
In 2000 Holland Tunnel Gallery opened a second art space, located on the island of Paros, Greece. Before moving to New York in the ‘80’s, Dutch artist and founder of the gallery Paulien Lethen lived on Paros on a permanent basis for a number of years. When she and her sister, Dutch jazz pianist/vocalist Heleen Schuttevaêr bought an historic Cycladic house in the old center of Parikia, they could realize an idea they already had for a long time. This summer, the Paros gallery exists 15 years that will be celebrated with special exhibitions and events. The Paros gallery is the complete opposite of he tiny Williamsburg gallery. The exhibitions begin at street level in arched spaces where previously potatoes, onions, olives and wine were stored and the courtyard, and continue upstairs. The kitchen, dining room, library and family bedrooms lead to the spectacular 15 foot (4 ½ meter) high salla (salon). Exhibitions often have an ancient Greek theme, like Labyrinth, Metamorphosis, Oracle, Pandemonium.
There are concerts, poetry readings, artist talks and model drawing classes where artists, Greek neighbors, friends and tourists gather. Invariably, everybody ends up in the courtyard and terrace with a glass of tasty Parian wine.

WILLIAMSBURG Brooklyn

STAIRMASTERS
4 FLOORS WITH ART

ONGOING EXHIBITION WITH OVER 100 PARTICIPATNG ARTISTS
Stairmasters, the third art space of Holland Tunnel Gallery, was launched in 2003 in the hall and monumental four-flight staircase of the brownstone next to Holland Tunnel Gallery. For a Williamsburg curators’ art weekend, gallery director/curator Paulien Lethen wanted to do something outstanding to present her stable of artists. She used the just restored hall and staircase as an additional exhibition space. From 2003 on, Lethen presents long-term exhibitions in Stairmasters. The artworks are installed from the ground to the top floor, inviting visitors to have some physical exercise while looking at the exhibition. The current show Framed, with a play on the double meaning of the word, features works by 110 artists, This mega group show includes a number of the 700 artists that have participated in exhibitions since the opening of Holland Tunnel Gallery in 1997. Another major exhibition was Delft Blues (2009-2014) that celebrated the historic Netherland-Japan trading and the influence of Japanese ceramics on the world famous Delft Blue pottery. Paulien Lethen provided the artists with plates, bowls and vases. This resulted in an exhibition with more than hundred hand painted plates by 55 artists.